Yesterday, if you listened early, you heard my passionate, scathing critique of our congressional members for lack of action on disaster declarations for Montana. This morning we heard from one, Senator Daines' Deputy Press Secretary:

Good Morning!

Senator Daines has been actively working to secure drought relief for Montana farmers and ranchers and has urged USDA to provide relief to every single one of Montana’s 56 counties. He has also pushed USDA to provide additional assistance and flexibilities for Montana farmers and ranchers as the entire state faces extreme drought conditions.

“Montana farmers and ranchers in every corner of our state are struggling because of the extreme drought conditions we’re facing in our state. I will not stop pressing USDA for additional assistance and will work to ensure all of our counties receive necessary relief. We must do everything we can to support Montana ag, especially right now under these conditions,” Daines stated.

Senator Daines has been leading the fight to secure emergency assistance for Montana.

Last week, Daines continued his efforts by leading over 40 senators and members of Congress in pushing USDA to provide additional drought relief and flexibilities for Montana agriculture producers located in counties that were not covered by drought designations or federal assistance programs.

In July, the Senator wrote to Secretary Vilsack showing his support for Governor Gianforte’s request that all 56 counties be designated as primary natural disaster areas. He also requested the authorization of emergency haying and grazing on Conservation Reserve Program land. Directly following Daines’ request, USDA opened up CRP land in Montana to provide additional forage for livestock.

In June, Daines sent a letter urging the Biden administration to open the Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge for emergency livestock grazing.

Senator Daines is also supportive of a bill that would include more than $7 billion in disaster assistance to help Montana farmers and ranchers with losses due to drought and other natural disasters.

Rachel Dumke

Deputy Press Secretary

Office of Senator Steve Daines

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This is great but it's too late. This action should have been implemented at the end of May when what was left in our state could have been put to use. If anyone should know better, it's Senator Jon Tester. The benefit from any haying and grazing has been lost. You can't let Washington bureaucrats make agricultural decisions. As a result, their lack of attention and action will have already caused irreparable harm to Montana farmers and ranchers. You're late and it's too late for many.

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