Today's article is an opportunity to show my snow picture and maybe talk year-round BBQing.

I saw the video where the young gal opened her door into the 47 inches of snow. And all of the snow piled on cars, pickups, and a large assortment of patio furniture.

Please share these with any out-of-state friends who may have mentioned moving to Big Sky Country. And maybe remind them that this storm isn't the "big one' we get every June.

The amount of snow on my BBQ is how I estimate how much snow I got from a particular storm. The openings that I had the mason leave for stainless steel doors are still not covered with those doors seventeen years after the thing was constructed due to the unbelievable cost of said stainless steel doors. In the next setup, those spaces will be bricked in.

Montana April snowstorm activities
Credit: Mark Wilson, Townsquare Media
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I've got grand plans for some sort of outdoor kitchen with a BBQ that is powered by the natural gas from my house, along with some sort of pellet grill built-in. Along with a beer fridge, and a nice smooth countertop to accommodate summertime card games.

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And just like those fixer-up shows on TV, I won't have any trouble getting contractors. Of course, they will have it done in 72 hours with everything done perfectly.

Now, back to the snow pics.

I saw one Facebook pic where they had to use a tractor to pull a 4WD pickup out of the snow.

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