Bottom line up front: "There are still no plans to evacuate the city of Red Lodge." -US Forest Service Public Information Officer Billy Chapman.

You can see the flames overtaking Mt. Maurice in the photo above. These photos are from Tuesday night in and near Red Lodge.

Credit Forrest Mandeville
Credit Jake Penwell

 

The smoke-filled haze even filled the skies in Billings on Tuesday, as the fire near Red Lodge is now topping 2,000 acres. The Red Cross has also set up a shelter to help anyone displaced by the Robertson Draw fire.

Credit Pat Beddow

According to InciWeb's update posted shortly after 7 p.m. on Tuesday night, evacuations are being ordered in the area:

The area along Rock Creek and Meeteetse Trail Rd previously under an Evacuation Warning is now being Evacuated. This includes all homes in the area west of Meeteetse Trail Road, and on the east side of Highway 212 from Meeteetse Trail Road to Westminster Spires Church Camp. It also includes all USDA Forest Service Recreation Residences in Corral Creek, Spring Creek, Snow Creek, and Sheep Creek. All campgrounds, dispersed camping and trailheads are closed in this area on both sides of Highway 212 from Red Lodge to the Lake Fork of Rock Creek, including the camping area to the south of the Lake Fork Road.

Evacuation Orders are also now in place for homes south of Highway 308 from Red Lodge east to Wolf Creek Road (with the exception of the Town of Bearcreek), south of Wolf Creek Road to Highway 72, east side of Highway 72 to Grove Creek road , and everything north of Grove Creek. The Town of Bearcreek is under an Evacuation Warning.

Shelters have been set up in two different locations. The Red Lodge Community Church at 308 S. Broadway is allowing small pets as long as they are restrained. And the Red Cross will be set up at the Veteran Memorial Civic Center in Red Lodge at 215 14th Street West.

KTVQ-TV also shared this update:

“We have about 80 personnel working on it at the moment, two type two crews, several engines including the Red Lodge fire engine, and our Custer Gallatin engine and multiple air resources. Starting tomorrow, a type two team will be arriving to take over management of this fire,” says Billy Chapman, the public information officer for Custer Gallatin National Forest, Tuesday afternoon in Red Lodge.

Credit Mark Holloway

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