So, while we had some time off last week I went to Cincinnati to visit my mom and move some furniture to Dubuque, Iowa for Maddy. Everyone knows you can't go to Cincy and not eat at Skyline Chili.

The place was packed, as usual, and the waitresses were really hustling, busting their butts. While I'm sitting there waiting for my 4 Cheese Coneys, in walks John Boehner, former Speaker of the House during President Obama's administration. I spotted him right away and some others had their picture taken with him as he was leaving. After he got into his Cadillac Escalade with Florida plates (he has a beautiful home in Florida while he's not living in his mansion in West Chester, Ohio), I left and noticed his table. When I got to the car outside I was so mad I turned around and went back inside and took a picture of his tip.

Get our free mobile app

Yup. This beneficiary of our tax dollars for all those years, a former lobbyist for the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, the recipient of a nice fee for his recent book blasting President Trump left a measly $2.75 tip to this waitress. You know, champion of the hard-working middle class? Two dollars and seventy-five cents. His bill had to be at least be 20 bucks, even at 15% that would be a $3 tip. He was one Republican that I never really did like and this example of his character just reinforced that for me. I know it's a free country and everyone can tip how they see fit, but this man should have known better. This Never Trumper is now a Never Tipper. See ya tomorrow at 5.

LOOK: Route 66’s quirkiest and most wonderful attractions state by state

Stacker compiled a list of 50 attractions--state by state--to see along the drive, drawing on information from historic sites, news stories, Roadside America, and the National Park Service. Keep reading to discover where travelers can get their kicks on Route 66.

LOOK: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America's national parks

Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling for 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America's national parks.