It appears that $4.89 a gallon is not going to slow anyone down over the 4th of July. AAA came out with their prediction today on people traveling and said that 42 million people will be traveling in a vehicle at least 50 miles or more over the holiday. They say it's a 3.7% increase in long-distance travel in all forms (planes, trains, and automobiles) from 2021.

What happened to the price of gas killing everyone's budget?

By the way, how do they know that exactly? Where do they pick up all those numbers? No one that I have ever talked to has been called or surveyed on their travel plans.

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It's the same thing we get from the Yellowstone National Park. Every year they tell us that the park had X number of millions of visitors. How do they know that? I was in the park one month ago when I went to Jake's wedding. The ranger at the gate took my money and gave me a map and wished me a good day. She didn't ask or even do a head count in the car so how do they know the individual visitor numbers?

All that aside, the fact is that people seem to not be driving a lot less for a good time or recreation.

They'll complain about how much it costs to get to work each week but have no problem with the recreational budget.

You would think that in Montana where distances are more of a factor it would have slowed that down a bit but it hasn't seemed to stop anyone from driving altogether.

Gas could be six dollars a gallon and people would finance it if they had to for the party. No matter where I go my trips are always over 50 miles away so it makes no difference to me. I'm one of the 42 million just because of where I live.

See ya tomorrow at 5 a.m.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.